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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
authorities detained mohammed jamal ahmed, suspected of being the leader of a terrorist cell that planned those attacks in egypt and is reportedly linked with the storming of the u.s. consulate in benghazi on september 11th. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton is expected to testify on the libya attack after an independent review board finishes its report. >> so we have every expectation that she will testify, that she will do so in an open setting, and that perhaps the leaders of the report, the lead investigators, may be testifying before us in a closed setting. >> senator john kerry, the chirm of the senate foreign relations committee, says secretary clinton will also appear before that panel. >>> and closer to home now, president obama has asked congress for $60 billion. that's in aide to help with superstorm sandy's cleanup in all states. the request comes in the midst of a tough fiscal cliff fight and house speaker john boehner says they will review the request by the president. new york and new jersey originally asked for a combined $79 billion in aide. the states' govern
revolt. but megyn: violent protests outside of egypt right now. members of president mohammed morsi's islam brotherhood. just think about what has happened here. the folks gathered en masse to protest the old leader, hosni mubarak. the muslim brotherhood said let's go for it. they reversed themselves and they rimini one. now, the people are back on the streets, protesting the new democratic policies by the new guy, where he did this huge paragraph, said that he could ignore the supreme court, pushed to the constitution, highly questionable, and the people in egypt are wondering what happened. human rights activists inside the country are claiming that the muslim brotherhood is now paying thugs to sexually assault women and physically assault men who gather in the square. fox news is not able to confirm these reports. several activists on the ground say that situation is getting very ugly again. steve harrigan is live from cairo. reporter: megyn, these are some of the worst clashes that we have seen so far in the protest. in the past, it has been pleased battling the protesters. righ
is not resolved. it is urging dialogue to avoid, quote, a dark tunnel. mohammed morsi has called for a day of dialogue but opposition groups rejected talks today. they walked out of meetings. the ones that bothered to show up. many didn't appear for the discussions. the egyptian opposition is demanding that a draft resolution on the constitution that is supposed to be voted on december 15th, they are demanding that vote be postponed indefinitely. they say the drafted constitution is too islamic and anti-democratic. late last night a member of the muslim brotherhood hinted as a compromise but as of right now, the rare hinted of compromise hasn't produced anything of substance. two sides still disagree over the vote and about the future of the constitution and the government. >> gregg: conner, thanks. >> with all of this going on. america is certainly sending egypt plenty of money. they get the most foreign aid of any country except for israel. an assistant for egypt has averaged $2 billion a year and military aide has held steady at about $1.3 billion since 1987. >> gregg: turning to syria
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
palace. it's a risky move that could cause conflict of supporters of mohammed morsi. the riot police seem to have the protestors bottled up in the square. the goal to march on the presidential palace failed today for the opposition. jenna: the question is whether we are headed toward potentially more violence in the streets. we'll keep an eye on what is happening in the streets today. jon: high levels of a deadly gas forced the evacuation of an elementary school forcing dozen of students to the hospital. an update on that story moments away jon: potentially deadly levels of carbon monoxide at an atlantiat atlanta elementary school. >> reporter: there is no law in the state of georgia that requires schools or buildings to install carbon monoxide detectors. this is an invisible gas that can be very, very dangerous when it's found in high levels, and so this happened at a school outside of atlanta, they were fixing a faulty boiler, the boiler went bad causing the carbon monoxide fumes to seep into the school. over 40 kids and seven adults were all sickened because of this. taken to a hospita
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
constitution. there are signs of trouble. the mohammed morsi's brother food is coming out, and they are mobilizing 120,000 troops during the different ways. supporters of the president say they are just defending the gains of the revolution, bill. bill: you know, who is going to win? i think everybody is watching that from around the world, including right where you are in cairo, and which way this vote will go. what is your sense after talking to people there, greg? >> reporter: most analysts we've heard from, we've seen say that president mohammed morsi constitution should pass maybe by a big margin. his muslim brotherhood party is just too well organized. they are involved in a strenuous get out the vote effort and some say there could be fraud involved with the vote. voting is going on at egyptian embassies around the world. muslim brotherhood operatives we are told busy there too helping at that vote. there could be another factor behind this constitution going forward, the folks here are just tired. it has been nearly two years since we were first here seeing the beg
by the muslim brotherhood. that's the party of the president, mohamed morsi. frustrated coptic christians and liberals walked out before the votes because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the mauritanian president is warning tension in mali could backfire. locals could align with rebels. one group they are concerned about is al qaeda in the islamic maghreb. that's the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us that aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger in the region. without international military intervention, mali's military won't be able to push them out. he told me he doesn't even have enough guns for his soldiers. >>> it's been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing get it back? incomes and consumer spending fell in october. experts we spoke to said sandy had a significant impact on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you thi
's presidential palace. according to the reporting of the associated press the egyptian president mohammed morsi had to sneak out the back door to avoid the crowding. this is a live look at demonstrations in cairo. hundreds of thousands have gathered night after night. rallying against president morsi's recent power grab. allies draft constitution one which would help him tighten his grip on power. earlier tonight it was far more chaotic. this was the scene outside that palace. police fired tear gas to try to break up the crowd. some reportedly chanted freedom or death. others down with the sons of dogs. they say they are not going anywhere unless and until the president cancels his plans to place himself above the law. steve hair tan live for news cairo. steve? >> shepard, this is really a new tactic for the opposition protesters. instead of simply staying here in tahrir square and chanting they went on offensive tonight toward the presidential palace. they got right to the compound walls until being tear gassed. it was reenergized the opposition. we have seen increase in recent days now they a
by president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands broke through a barrier before throwing rocks and bottles at morsi's home. they also spray painted graffiti on the palace walls. morsi sparked new outrage yesterday after he refused to back off his controversial plan to expand his presidential powers which give him immunity from judicial oversight. >>> a small victory for john mcafee today after he took his fight to stay in guatemala to the country's highest court. mcafee's attorney tells martin savidge a judge granted a stay today that allows him to remain in the country until his immigration case can be heard in court. his attorney says that could take a month or more. the software pioneer has been fighting deportation to belize where he is wanted for questioning in the shooting death of his neighbor there. >>> george zimmerman's lawyers filed several new motions today. among them, his legal team wants his gps monitoring removed. zimmerman who is charged with the murder of trayvon martin has been electronically monitored since april. his attorneys also requested the state to hand over docu
earths and opponents much egyptian president mohammed morsi staging massive rallies one day before voting on a draft constitution that has plunged the count are country into a political hotbed. here is the scene. >> reporter: we are on the eave of that crucial vote. this is what it's all b. this is a copy of the draft constitution. it is 63-pages long, 256 articles and it is causing a lot of problems, including in the egyptian city today of alexandria. protestors for and against president mohammed morsi and the constitution clashing in the streets after a cleric urged a yes vote at friday prayers, he's not supposed to do that. rocks were torn, cars were torched, there were injuries and arrests. so far in cairo it has been quiet. the muslim brotherhood, promorsi forces gathering in one location in fairly big numbers. also behind us here in tahrir square and in the presidential palace the critics of the constitution and president mohammed morsi also gathering. so far the two sides have stayed apart. alisyn: is there anyway to proceed ticket what will happe predict what will happen this week
been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the revolutions are going around the region. syria is teetering, georgia is burning, and the future is yet to be written. the question now is in all these countries will there be elections, will the islamists win? will it be one man, one vote or one-man, one-vote, one time. so with that we are going to debate the motion of democracy is the triumph in the middle east, it's up about box and is unavoidable and essential. we will have five minutes of opening remarks from each of our panelists today. we will start with ruel again to the good and go to brian and have q&a for myself as well as the audience and our panelists will be allowed to minutes at the end to restate their case and he essentially persuade you to believe what they believe. we will start now with ruel. ruel, you may begin. >> this is that such an angle. ruel, i'm confident you wi
, the party of mohammed morsi. frustrated coptic christians walked out because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the -- is warning tension could backfire. the reason, that's something of great concern and one group they're worried about is the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger and without intervention, he says mali's military won't be able to push them out. >>> it has been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? incomes and consume er spending fell in october. economists said sandy had a significant effect on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you think i'm about to say. after weeks of criticize m from republicans, she now faces scrutiny over her personal investments. stock holdings listed in her financial disclosure report raise a potential conflict of interest if she w
? >>> in egypt, president mohamed morsi is calling for talks to end the political crisis in the country. the opposition is calling for a boycott of that meeting. at least six people are dead after protests turned violent. anti-morsi supporters are demonstrating against the president and the new constitution. they say morsi has given himself too much power, but the president says the powers are only temporary and will become void once the new constitution is adopted. >>> now back to the u.s. and the controversy over the benghazi attack. secretary of state hillary clinton will testify at an open congressional hearing. her testimony will follow the release of a report by the state department's accountability review board. the state department has been under fire for its handling of the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >>> the syrian crisis could reach a new level. with concerns that the syrian regime could possibly use chemical weapons. we'll tell you how the u.s. is reacting. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew wh
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
by the egyptian president mohammed morsi. it is expected to take place at any time. we're told that during the day he met with the army chief as well as his ministers to try to come up with some way to stablize the country. he was in the presidential palace earlier in the day. this despite the fact that there was some very violent clashes in the last 24 hours just outside that palace. take a look at the tape and you can see what took place just a few hours ago. on one side supporters of th president morsi. on the other secular groups say they oppose the islamist agenda. during the clashes firebombs and rocks were thrown. there was also gunfire. as you mentioned at least seven dead and at least 600 injured. the republican guard placed tanks and armored vehicles outside the presidential palace this morning and the commander of the guard which is primarily tasked with protecting the presidential compound tried to assure egyptians in this conflict it is not going to take sides. in the last few hours the guard ordered rival protesters to leave the presidential palace. morsi supporters have withdrawn an
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)